J.C. for Prez

Passed this while on a walk through my neighborhood a day or two ago. I didn’t even know he was running.

My Town

A Year of Sprinting

I’ve been using Chris Fox’s technique of sprints for about a year now, and the results are pretty impressive. Since August of last year, I’ve published five books with another unpublished manuscript waiting in the wings. I’m a quarter of the way through a new manuscript that I’ll publish before year’s end too. Plus I have a bunch of finished short stories that I’m gathering up for release sometime down the road; once I have enough to put into a collection.

I’ve written more than 380,000 new words since I started. Compare that with my old rate of production, which netted me around 80,000 words annually. Maybe 100,000 words on a good year.

That’s a huge productivity increase.

But sprints are only half of the story. I also adopted Dean Wesley Smith’s method of “cycling” and not rewriting which allowed me time to edit, proofread, and publish all those words.

I’ve had a ton of fun writing all these books this year, and I’ve learned a lot by doing. I even crossed the million word written mark, a huge achievement for me.

I’m looking forward to another great year of writing even more books. Hopefully, you’ll come along with me for the ride.

Self-Doubt

 

We all know that self-doubt will kill your creativity and your productivity faster than just about anything else. To get books finished and launched into the world, writers need to get past their self-doubt.

One technique that some writers use is to imagine their self-doubt like a troll that sits in the corner and says awful things. This troll can’t die, and it can’t escape your head. The idea is to beat that troll down until he’s barely a whisper, or withhold food and keep him on the brink of starvation; too weak and tired to talk shit. In other words, don’t feed the troll.

I subscribed to this philosophy for a long time, until I started to think about it differently. I still see the nagging self-doubt troll in the corner, no doubt, but I began digging into why he says the shit that he says. Nobody does anything without a reason; not even imaginary trolls trapped in your head.

Eventually, I figured it out. The troll isn’t your enemy.

He’s your friend.

He tells you that you’re not good enough. He says you’ll fail. He says that you’re not smart enough. He says you’re a hack.

He does this because he’s afraid for you.

Think about it. What if you try and fail? What if people write bad reviews about you? What if people think you’re stupid or untalented? What if people don’t like you? All these things are risks when you put yourself out there for others to see–and judge.

He’s trying to protect you by dissuading you from taking risks that might cause harm. Remember, he’s stuck in your head with nowhere to go. He can’t die, not until you die. So whatever you go through, he does too. He takes the punches right alongside you.

He’s not your enemy. He’s actually your best friend, but his communication skills are lacking. He’s blunt. He’s rude. He’s childish. He’s impudent. He’s crass.

Hell, he’s scared all the time; what else do you expect?

So instead of beating him down the next time he starts his shit, maybe you should console him. Pat him on his bumpy little troll head and tell him that everything is okay. Tell him that you appreciate his concern, but you got this. Tell him that if he just chills out and sits quietly, the storm will pass and everything will be okay again. You’ll take the risks and keep him safe.

Like a fussy baby, once he’s calm he’ll shut up. He’ll go back to whispering in the corner, a soft murmur that you’ll ignore while you get things done.

Once you empathize with him, you’ll understand that his words are a misguided effort to keep the both of you safe. Ultimately, instead of feeling resentment toward him, you’ll feel pity.

And as far as feelings go, resentment is a whole lot more expensive to maintain than pity.

Devil Breed Paperback Proof Is In

Just got the proof copy of the paperback edition of Devil Breed. It looks great, so we’re all set for the August 27th release in both ebook and paperback.

And like all my paperbacks, if you buy it you get the Kindle ebook for free.

So if you like a good monster mystery with an unexpected ending, you might want to pick this baby up.

Tell your friends, tell your family, tell the world!

Paperbacks Are Ready

Good news; the new paperbacks are ready to go! I now have eight novels, two novellas, and one collection of short stories all available on paper. Also, if you pick up one of the paperbacks from Amazon, you get the Kindle version for no additional charge.

This time around, I’ll have the paperback version of my upcoming novel, Devil Breed, available on August 27th, the same day as the ebook. Pretty cool, eh?

You can pick these babies up at Amazon and Barnes & Noble. (Unfortunately, you can’t get the Nook ebook version included along for free from B&N like you can from Amazon.)

So if you’re interested in picking up a paperback copy of any of my books, follow this link to my books page and choose your title. Click on the Amazon or B&N link at the bottom of the page and it’ll take you right where you need to go.