Badlands Trilogy

Several months back, I quietly released an omnibus containing the first three books of my Badlands series. Simply titled Badlands Trilogy, this edition contains three complete novels: Into the Badlands, Beyond the Badlands, and Out of the Badlands.

 

Badlands TrilogyAt the time, I thought the series was finished, aside from a few more novellas set within the same universe. But as it turned out, I realized there was more story there. Something unique enough, something interesting enough to warrant at least one more novel. Maybe more. I’m not sure how many, but definitely one more go around with Ed Brady and his family.

So if you haven’t yet picked up any of my Badlands books, you might want to consider getting the trilogy omnibus edition. You’ll save a couple of bucks in the process and get all three books in one handy edition.

Stay tuned right here at my blog for more info on the series as it develops. Better yet, sign up for my mailing list. You’ll be the first to know about new releases and you’ll get a free book just for signing up.

It Comes at Night

It Comes at Night was nothing like I thought it would be. I expected a zombie flick or monsters crawling around in the darkness trying to eat the protagonist. But this film is a psychological thriller at its core and a damn smart one at that.

The gist of the plot is that a plague of some sort has decimated the world. Paul lives with his family in their remote house, away from the virus. They’re reasonable people who survive by being smart and cautious, adhering to safe routines that have thus far worked to keep them alive. But when another young family arrives at Paul’s door, his system of order is irreparably disrupted. Paranoia and fear creep in, much like the virus they’re so desperately trying to avoid, bringing with it dire consequences.

It’s most interesting to me in the way this film explores how two families-all logical, reasonable, and pragmatic people-can be pushed to do things they’d never normally do. It reminds me of that old Twilight Zone episode, The Monsters are Due on Maple Street, where Serling posits that good people are capable of terrible things, provided they’re sufficiently afraid for themselves and their loved ones. I’ve touched on these themes in my own books, something I like to call “conditional morality”. Probably explains why I liked this film so much.

John F. Kennedy said that the only thing we have to fear, is fear itself. While it’s true that Paul and his family do have a very real virus to fear, it takes a back seat to paranoia in this tense thriller. The fear is the real threat here; it’s real and it’s deadly.

“Redemption” Is Here!

My latest book, Redemption In the Badlands, is now available from all major ebook retailers.

Pastor Dan Owens wants to believe there’s still good left in an evil world. When he meets Lilly, he’s certain that helping this woman in need is the right thing to do.

In fact, it’s his mission in life.

But when a murderous gang kidnaps Lilly, Dan’s oath to protect her will send him down a path that no man of God should ever have to travel.

To save her, Dan will have to do things the hard way.

Old Testament style.

To pick up your copy, follow this link. There you’ll find buy buttons for all retailers, along with a free sample if you’re on the fence.

I hope you guys like this book as much as I do. Thanks for reading!

Badlands #3 Ready for the Editor

Out of the BadlandsBadlands #3 (Out of the Badlands) is finished and ready to go off to the editor. It’s nearly 100,000 words and the longest book of the series. I’m hoping it goes over well, but you never can tell with these sorts of things. Once I get a firm date on when I’ll get the manuscript back, I’ll put up a preorder page for the book. So look for an April timeframe.

While I was at it, I attached the cover for you as well.

And hell, let’s throw in an excerpt from the first chapter too. It’s unedited, but you get the idea.

Chapter One

Twelve year old Sam Treiber watched the big oak fall as a jagged arc of white-hot lightning tore a hole in the sky, illuminating the land below. The tree lurched, the undersides of its leaves flashing white as its massive bulk came roaring down to the ground, felled by a wind gust as easily as a first year sapling.

Denise Treiber looked up from her tattered and yellowed copy of ‘Salem’s Lot. “What the hell was that?”

“A tree just fell outside,” Sam said, turning away from the scene outside the window. “A big one.”

“This is a hell of a storm,” Denise replied. She relaxed, her eyes back on the book. “Bound to take down some trees.”

“I think it hit the fence,” Sam said, turning to look at his mother.

Eyes wide, Denise looked up at her son. She closed the book without saving her place and swallowed hard. “Are you sure?”

“Pretty sure.”

“You need to be damn sure.” She got to her feet and went to the window, gazing into the blackness. Another bolt of lightning arced, lighting up the landscape like the flash from a giant camera. Just as Sam described, the tree lay across a section of ruined fence.

“Shit,” Denise said, walking toward the door of the room they shared. “We need to tell the others. Get your shoes on.”

Sam sat, his eyes wide.

“Come! Now!”

Sam leapt to his feet. Outside, the lightning struck again, brightening the yard in a blinding flash of light. Sam caught sight of the gigantic tree’s bushy top. Three figures appeared through the leaves, their white skin nearly reflective in the brightness. Then the light vanished, replaced by inky darkness.

Sam rubbed his eyes, trying to get rid of the spots in his vision. He stared again, but could see nothing in the dark.

Those weren’t carriers, he thought. They weren’t people either.

They were something else.

“Mom…” he began.

“Let’s go, Sam!” his mother called.

Sam ran to the nightstand beside the room’s only bed and yanked open the top drawer, fumbling through the contents inside.

“Sam!”

“Just a sec,” he replied. A moment more of searching and he found was he was looking for. He retrieved the one possession he prized more than anything else: his camera. Fed by rechargeable batteries refreshed when the generators were turned on, Sam had been carrying the thing ever since Jonathan, the man who ran the camp and took Sam and his mother in, gave it to him.

“Sam, move your ass!”

Sam gripped the camera and stuffed it into his pocket before picking up the flashlight from the nightstand. He turned to see his mother place her pistol into her back pocket and open the door. He slipped his shoes on and the two of them bolted down the hall, flashlight in hand, the forgotten candle casting a pale yellow glow inside the empty room.